Executive Summary

In the 2020s, approaching disaster recovery (DR) the same way that organizations have for the last few decades—with human-driven brute force, widespread complexity, and high costs—is going to be a career-limiting move. In fact, IT professionals who want to maneuver their way into a corner office must learn to think very differently about DR!

This guide will explore these five considerations in depth and provide you the tools to think about your DR strategy for this new decade.


Prudent IT leaders will reflect on the following five considerations when visualizing the future for their DR architectures:

  • Is DR really a business you want to be in this decade?
  • With the right technology, your budget can go much farther than it does today
  • The disaster threat landscape is much different today with ransomware becoming a more pressing concern
  • Backups are important, but recovery is the only thing that matters
  • You don’t have to settle when it comes to disaster recovery—you can easily meet and exceed your recovery SLAs

While legacy strategies for DR may have been cutting edge at the time of their introduction, they’re insufficient to meet the needs of modern business. In a recent survey of 395 IT leaders, 89.6% of respondents indicated that their ability to respond quickly to a disaster has become more important to their organization over the past year. IT users depend on technology more now than ever before. Likewise, the amount of downtime the average business can tolerate grows shorter every year.

At the same time, increasing public cloud adoption has changed the calculus for protecting business data and application workloads. The introduction of VMware Cloud into hyperscale clouds will be the same kind of great equalizer across clouds that vSphere was for data center workloads. Thus, the future is bright for DR planners.

Prudent IT leaders will reflect on the following five considerations when visualizing the future for their DR architectures.

89.6%

of IT leaders say that the ability to respond (quickly) to a disaster has become more important to their organization over the past year.